books 2016

Jan. 1st, 2017 07:03 pm
clevermynnie: (see us waving)
Read some books this year, here they are:

1. Carrie Brownstein, Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl
2. Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass
3. Eric Weitz, Laughter And Theatre
4. Sam Kean, The Disappearing Spoon
5. Laurie Halse Anderson, Speak
6. Jennifer Egan, The Invisible Circus
7. Russ Harris, Reality Slap
8. Gloria Steinem, My Life On The Road
9. Michael Connelly, The Scarecrow
10. 100 Malicious Little Mysteries
11. Dan Simmons, Hyperion
12. Alastair Reynolds, Revelation Space
13. Dan Simmons, The Fall of Hyperion
14. Jen Sincero, You Are A Badass
15. Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policeman's Union
16. Parallelogramophonograph, Do It Now
17. Julie Schumacher, Dear Committee Members
18. Kate Tempest, Hold Your Own
19. Charles Duhigg, The Power of Habit
20. Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist
21. Paul Theroux, The Mosquito Coast
22. Stanislaw Lem, Solaris
23. David Sedaris, Holidays On Ice
24. Heather Havrilesky, How To Be A Person In The World
25. Susan Sontag, Illness As Metaphor

books 2015

Feb. 17th, 2016 12:12 pm
clevermynnie: (al fresco)
I still keep a book log! I went to post it for 2015 and just realized I never posted the one for 2014... so here are both.

2014:

  1. Kurt Vonnegut, The Sirens of Titan

  2. Arthur C. Clarke, Rendezvous with Rama

  3. Cheryl Strayed, Wild

  4. Robin McKinley, The Blue Sword

  5. Robin McKinley, The Hero and the Crown

  6. Tina Fey, Bossypants

  7. Sloane Crosley, Best American Travel Writing 2011

  8. Joe Samuel and Heather Urquhart, Sing It!

  9. Joanna Russ, The Female Man

  10. Jon Ronson, Lost at Sea

  11. Ursula K. Le Guin, The Lathe of Heaven

  12. Patrick Wyse Jackson, The Building Stones of Dublin

  13. Geoff Ryman, Was

  14. Philip K. Dick, Time Out Of Joint

  15. Roman Krznaric, The Wonder Box

  16. Gerald Durrell, My Family And Other Animals

  17. NAS/NAE/IOM, Enhancing the Postdoctoral Experience

  18. Isaac Asimov, On Numbers

  19. Austin Kleon, Steal Like An Artist

  20. Greg Dean, Step By Step to Standup Comedy

  21. Jose Saramago, Small Memories

  22. Greg Bear, Blood Music

  23. Amy Poehler, Yes Please

  24. Cheryl Strayed, Tiny Beautiful Things

  25. Ian Banks, The Wasp Factory

  26. Elizabeth Gilbert, The Signature of All Things


2015:

  1. Arthur Miller, After the Fall

  2. Ruth Patel, 52 Ways of Looking at a Poem

  3. Alan Watts, Taoism: Way Beyond Seeking

  4. Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

  5. Peter McGraw and Joel Warner, The Humor Code

  6. Caryl Churchill, The Skriker

  7. Brad Warner, Hardcore Zen

  8. Haruki Murakami, 1Q84

  9. Alan Watts, The Tao of Philosophy

  10. Marie Norman, Marsha Lovett, Michael Bridges, Michele DiPietro, and Susan Ambrose, How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching

  11. Zadie Smith, On Beauty

  12. The British Museum Haiku

  13. Eric Berne, Games People Play: The Psychology of Human Relationships

  14. Anne Bogart, And Then, You Act

  15. Lao Tzu, Tao Teh Ching

  16. Pascal Baudry, French and Americans: The Other Shore

  17. Oliver Burkeman, The Antidote

  18. Stephen Pinker, The Language Instinct

  19. Jennifer Egan, A Visit From The Goon Squad

  20. Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

  21. Shirley Jackson, We Have Always Lived In The Castle

  22. Jon Mooallem, Wild Ones

  23. China Mieville, Perdido Street Station

books!

Jan. 9th, 2014 06:10 pm
clevermynnie: (see us waving)
Amazingly, I have now been keeping a book log for 10 years. Last year's is here, and these are the books I read this year:

1. Ted Chiang, Stories of Your Life and Others
2. Flann O'Brien, At Swim-Two-Birds
3. Ted Chiang, The Lifecycles of Software Objects
4. Sarah Ruhl, The Clean House
5. Neal Stephenson, Anathem
6. Ursula Le Guin, The Word for World is Forest
7. Geoff Ryman, Lust
8. Iain M. Banks, The Hydrogen Sonata
9. John Vonhof, Fixing Your Feet
10. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Wind, Sand, and Stars
11. Cordelia Fine, Delusions of Gender
12. Mick Napier, Improvise: Scene from the Inside Out
13. Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In
14. David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas
15. Isaac Asimov, The Gods Themselves
16. Mark Henderson, The Geek Manifesto
17. Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos Papadimitriou, Logicomix: An Epic Search for Truth
18. Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth
19. William Glasser, Choice Theory
20. George Gamow, Mr. Tompkins in Wonderland
21. Susan Jeffers, Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway
22. Alan Watts, Still The Mind
23. James Merrill, The Changing Light At Sandover
24. Jon Ronson, The Psychopath Test
25. Jon Krakauer, Into the Wild
26. Alice Munro, Dear Life
27. David Sedaris, Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls
28. Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon
29. Norman Doidge, The Brain That Changes Itself
30. Anne Dickson, The Mirror Within
31. Geoff Ryman, The Child Garden
32. Brian Jacques, Mariel of Redwall
33. Ursula Le Guin, The Dispossessed

If I had to choose, I'd say my favorites were the two Geoff Ryman books.

booooooks

Jan. 1st, 2013 10:49 pm
clevermynnie: (al fresco)
In compiling my book log for this year, I found that it was, as they say, the lowest book year on record. (Admittedly, only by two books.) I can't think why! Last year's is here, and somehow I read more while writing a thesis and moving across an ocean. Well, as long as I enjoyed the books I read this year, and let me tell you, I did! They were:

1. Robin Black, If I Loved You I Would Tell You This
2. Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking
3. Janson's History of Art: The Western Tradition
4. Arthur Conan Doyle, The Sign of Four
5. Daniel Kahneman, Thinking, Fast and Slow
6. John le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy
7. Iain M. Banks, Surface Detail
8. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
9. Iain M. Banks, The Player of Games
10. Mark Kurlansky, Non-Violence
11. Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang, Welcome to Your Child's Brain
12. Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye
13. Slow Dublin
14. John le Carré, The Honourable Schoolboy
15. Jay Wexler, The Odd Clauses: Understanding the Constitution through Ten of Its Most Curious Provisions
16. Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
17. Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
18. Roger Zelazny, Nine Princes in Amber
19. Roger Zelazny, The Guns of Avalon
20. Roger Zelazny, Sign of the Unicorn
21. Roger Zelazny, The Hand of Oberon
22. Roger Zelazny, The Courts of Chaos
23. Julia Child, My Life In France
24. Geoff Dyer, Yoga For People Who Can't Be Bothered To Do It
25. Gwyneth Jones, Spirit
26. Herman Hesse, Siddhartha
27. Iain M. Banks, Use of Weapons
28. Jennifer Egan, Look At Me
29. Geoff Dyer, But Beautiful
30. Oliver Morton, Eating the Sun: How Plants Power the Planet
31. Geoff Ryman, Air
32. China Miéville, Embassytown
33. Connie Willis, Blackout
34. Connie Willis, All Clear
35. Haruki Murakami, Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman
36. Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being A Wallflower
37. Lois McMaster Bujold, Captain Vorpatril's Alliance
38. Jerome K. Jerome, Three Men In A Boat
39. Iain M. Banks, Look To Windward

My favorite novels were probably 9, 16, 25, and 31. And 3, 10, 11, and 17 were very good non-fiction. Gosh, it looks like I mostly read sci-fi and science-themed nonfiction, doesn't it? Perhaps I should diversify.
clevermynnie: (Default)
So many things have been happening that it is easier to recount them in bullet form! Highlights include:

*Lovely geek wedding of Dublin people who I wish we saw more of
*Lots of SW:TOR and D&D which is awesome, especially since WoW kept revoking my expansion purchase
*Running recovery and marathon prep for the Dublin Marathon next Monday going well
*Finding new tasty Indian and Spanish restaurants around town
*Stopped eating meat (aside from fish), and am pretty happy about it
*Totally loved the books Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis, and Embassytown by China Mieville
*Fun science outreach project at work bearing some fruit

I actually have pictures for the last one; a photo of Ben watching a video I did about my research that's currently up in a science museum, and a photo of me talking about this poster I did in conjunction with a graphic designer who made it beautiful. Science outreach is really fun!

outreach video

outreach poster
clevermynnie: (Default)
So many things have been happening that it is easier to recount them in bullet form! Highlights include:

*Lovely geek wedding of Dublin people who I wish we saw more of
*Lots of SW:TOR and D&D which is awesome, especially since WoW kept revoking my expansion purchase
*Running recovery and marathon prep for the Dublin Marathon next Monday going well
*Finding new tasty Indian and Spanish restaurants around town
*Stopped eating meat (aside from fish), and am pretty happy about it
*Totally loved the books Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis, and Embassytown by China Mieville
*Fun science outreach project at work bearing some fruit

I actually have pictures for the last one; a photo of Ben watching a video I did about my research that's currently up in a science museum, and a photo of me talking about this poster I did in conjunction with a graphic designer who made it beautiful. Science outreach is really fun!

outreach video

outreach poster

air

Sep. 14th, 2012 05:19 pm
clevermynnie: (Default)
I'm still sick, annoyingly, but it gave me the opportunity to read Air by Geoff Ryman, seriously one of the best books in recent memory (and I read a lot). It combines a lot of interesting threads: how technological development affects culture, globalization, women pushing for more in traditional societies, and a really interesting speculative take on the world 10 years down the line. It has a little bit of a Haruki Murakami feel, but is more hard sci-fi than Murakami, and also more concerned with women. I feel like I need to email half the people I know and tell them to read it.

air

Sep. 14th, 2012 05:19 pm
clevermynnie: (Default)
I'm still sick, annoyingly, but it gave me the opportunity to read Air by Geoff Ryman, seriously one of the best books in recent memory (and I read a lot). It combines a lot of interesting threads: how technological development affects culture, globalization, women pushing for more in traditional societies, and a really interesting speculative take on the world 10 years down the line. It has a little bit of a Haruki Murakami feel, but is more hard sci-fi than Murakami, and also more concerned with women. I feel like I need to email half the people I know and tell them to read it.
clevermynnie: (see us waving)
Awhile back, I started keeping a centralized list of book recommendations. It has now grown to a hilariously unmanageable size, but also I have read fifty books from it! So that's cool. But I figured I would make a new post to move the list to and retire the old one, which has served me well for four years. I'm also now culling titles from the list that I can't find in the library, because I don't want to keep trying to get those books! I do read a lot of stuff that circumvents this list, as well, but that's all in my yearly book lists.

But anyway, if you have any book recommendations, shoot! Full list below, to be updated as I read things!

Already read from this list:
1. Oliver Morton - Eating the Sun
2. Geoff Ryman - Air
3. Jennifer Egan - Look at Me
4. China Mieville - Embassytown
5. Connie Willis - Blackout/All Clear

to read! )
clevermynnie: (Default)
It has been a really Game of Thrones centered couple of days, in spite of the second season having recently ended. I found out that the Mourne Mountains, where I ran on Saturday, are actually the location of a fair amount of scenic filming in the show. The Tollymore Forest along the north side was apparently where the opening scene of the entire show was filmed, that scene being the reason why I put down Game of Thrones and didn't watch it again for several months. Apparently there's also a lot of filming along the Antrim Coast, which I haven't yet been to.

And then, last night Ben and I went to see an Indian-inspired production of The Tempest, as part of the Dublin Shakespeare Festival, and who should we see clowning for the audience before the show but the guy who plays Joffrey Barathian! He was playing a tin whistle and capering in costume, which was really weird after seeing him so much as Joffrey. My instinctive reaction to his character at this point is revulsion, so seeing him in person kind of makes one want to push him over and yell 'Winter is coming!' But I bet he gets a lot of that, playing such a dislikeable character. Anyway, apparently he's a student at TCD and thus was just helping out with the festival.

I have mixed feelings about Game of Thrones. On the one hand, it has pretty interesting plots and a whole host of interesting characters. It took me a bit to get into the plots because the background is so complex, but once I was caught up I really liked all the maneuvering. The violence is really hard for me to stomach, though, and that's what turned me away from the show initially. The only good argument I've heard for it is that it shows realities of war and medieval living, rather than whitewashing how violent that would be. Which is true, but on the other hand it really feels like HBO pushing as hard as it possibly can to be edgy which I find off-putting. And the nudity is just so over-the-top, completely gratuitous 90% of the time because hey, it's HBO and we can toss in some naked ladies if we feel like it. Never men, unless it's strictly needed for the plot, of course.

I wish there were more fantasy series being made. Because honestly Game of Thrones is pretty much the best, in a somewhat anemic field, but it would be great to see more series with its production values presenting fantasy plots. There are lots of great books to go from.

And I know, I should read the books that Game of Thrones is based on! But they are unfinished, and I am really hesitant to pick up a sprawling fantasy epic with hundreds of characters, that I may someday have to reread if a new book comes out, or that may never be finished at all. I will definitely read them someday. But for now I am limiting myself to the show.

bradbury

Jun. 7th, 2012 08:57 am
clevermynnie: (see us waving)
I was very distraught to hear that Ray Bradbury died, though he did live a long and pretty great life. I think his essay in the current sci-fi issue of the New Yorker may be the last thing he published. For a long time after reading Fahrenheit 451 in high school, I kept a bookmark onto which I had copied the following quote:

Stuff your eyes with wonder, live as if you'd drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It's more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories. Ask no guarantees, ask for no security, there never was such an animal. And if there were, it would be related to the great sloth which hangs upside down in a tree all day every day, sleeping its life away. To hell with that, shake the tree and knock the great sloth down on his ass.

quiet

Jun. 5th, 2012 03:06 pm
clevermynnie: (Default)
It has to be some kind of deep irony that, just as I get a copy of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, we have a solid week of social activities in almost all of our free time. We had friends from Philadelphia visit, and took them up to Howth for hiking and picnicking even though the weather was bad. And we went for drinks with some new people, had Ben's coworkers over to brew a brett wheat beer, and have even more stuff coming up this week. It's exciting! It's just also draining. And so far that is one thing I am really enjoying about Quiet, how well it makes the distinction between introverts and misanthropes. Introverts have friends too! And I'm realizing now that most of the time someone (including me) said, "I'm not really an introvert, I'm very outgoing and talkative with people I know, I'm just quieter in large groups or with strangers until I get comfortable," part of what they were saying is "I'm an introvert but I want you to know I'm not a misanthrope." Plus it covers lots of research, has a lot of interesting ideas regarding workspaces and living, and is overall very validating as a discussion that doesn't pathologize shyness or the propensity to think carefully about things. There are benefits to introversion, just as there are benefits to extroversion, and it's helpful to identify your own preferences and then work with them to get where you want to go. I also like the many facets of the introvert/extrovert spectrum that the book covers (and I'm not actually introverted on all of them!).

One thing that is getting me through this week, though, is knowing that this weekend I will get plenty of time to myself. I'm taking the train up to Northern Ireland Friday evening, running the Mourne Ultra Saturday, and coming back Sunday morning. I'm going alone and don't know anyone else running, so I'll bring a lot of podcasts for the race and reading for the time alone at the B&B. I am really excited about this race, especially now that I have realized I will almost certainly be able to do my longest run ever in a race, even if I miss a time cutoff and don't finish the full race. That's because the first cutoff, for the marathon, is 6.5 hours, way longer than even my trickiest trail marathon. After that I have 3 hours to do another 13 miles, which under normal circumstances would be easy but I may be slowing down a lot by then... missing that cutoff would still give me 39 miles run in a race, though. And that's really the make or break point, because after that cutoff you get 3 hours to go another 9 miles, then you're just covering the last 3 miles to the finish. If I could make that second cutoff I would have a really good chance of finishing, but if not it should still be a great experience, and great practice so that someday I could actually finish a 50-mile race. Which is something I really want.

I do feel as prepared as I can be without having done a race of this length before, though. The 50k last month was good practice for going through the food/drink/sunscreen/layers dance that is required for longer runs, and after having those salt issues I figured out where to get electrolyte tablets here which ought to help a lot. Plus I'll be doing this with my Camelbak instead of the smaller waist hydration pack I used at the 50k, and honestly I prefer the Camelbak. And I am just super excited about the course, from Rostrevor to Newcastle and back, which should be so lovely. Hopefully the weather cooperates!

library

Feb. 10th, 2012 09:38 pm
clevermynnie: (al fresco)
One of the other perks of my job is free access for me and a guest to the Trinity College Dublin Old Library, which is where the Book of Kells is kept! So today at lunch Ben and I went to go see it. It's gorgeous, though you can only see a few pages at a time so it's nice that they have reproductions of a lot of the pages on display as well. The most famous page is probably the chi rho page, which was actually in Janson's:



So intricate and impressive. They also had the Trinity College Harp (also called the Harp of Brian Boru), which is a medieval harp that's on the currency here as well as the logos for Guinness and other brewers, so that was quite cool to see. And the room it's in, the Long Room, is insanely beautiful! It is all leather-bound books, busts of famous writers, dark wood paneling; sadly, they don't allow photography, but you can find pictures online that show how impressive it is. It's like the library to end all libraries.
clevermynnie: (al fresco)
I finished reading Janson's History of Art!

I started reading it in September and realized pretty quickly that there was only so much I could really absorb from it per day. It's a slow and dense read, even with the many pictures. But I settled into a routine of reading 20-30 pages each day and now it's over! It's kind of sad, actually. I knew a fair bit about western art going in, but I got a lot of context and historical placement from the book, and learned more about many art movements that I sort of knew about. I imagine I will retain that more than individual artists or paintings, mostly likely... though I have found a lot of Janson's flashcards online if I wanted to drill those.

One of my favorite unexpected things about Janson's is that it covered architecture movements as thoroughly as painting or sculpture movements. That's pretty sensible now that I think about it, but it was like a happy bonus. They covered photography quite a bit as well, but I expected that.

Does anyone have recommendations for other art type books that are worth reading?

books!

Jan. 2nd, 2012 02:28 pm
clevermynnie: (mask)
Another year, another book log. Last year's is here, and apparently I like squeaking in just short of 52. Well, that's ok, I wrote and defended a thesis and then moved to a new country this past year, so I may not have had the most time to read.

1. Julie des Jardins, The Madame Curie Complex
2. Ann Patchett, Bel Canto
3. Bob and Shelley-Lynn Glover, The Competitive Runner's Handbook
4. Suzanne Rivecca, Death Is Not An Option
5. Umberto Eco, How To Travel With A Salmon
6. William Gibson, Pattern Recognition
7. Alice Walker, Meridian
8. Randy Mosher, Radical Brewing
9. Sarah Susanka, The Not So Big House
10. Cornel West, Race Matters
11. Edward Glaeser, Triumph of the City
12. Alison Bechdel, Fun Home
13. Ursula Le Guin, Eye of the Heron
14. China Mieville, The City & The City
15. Octavia Butler, Wild Seed
16. Jane Hirshfield, Given Sugar, Given Salt
17. Octavia Butler, Mind of My Mind
18. Nassim Taleb, The Black Swan
19. Octavia Butler, Clay's Ark
20. Stephen Covey, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People
21. Octavia Butler, Patternmaster
22. J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey
23. Dave Eggers, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
24. Alan Lightman, Einstein's Dreams
25. Ha Jin, In The Pond
26. Mary Roach, Packing For Mars
27. Isabel Allende, Island Beneath The Sea
28. David Sedaris, Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk
29. Orhan Pamuk, The Museum of Innocence
30. William Goldman, The Princess Bride
31. William Gibson, Spook Country
32. Philip Roth, Portnoy's Complaint
33. William Gibson, Zero History
34. Pat Boran, A Short History of Dublin
35. Arthur Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles
36. David Foster Wallace, Consider The Lobster
37. Jane Austen, Emma
38. Richard Dawkins, The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing
39. Paul Davies, How To Build A Time Machine
40. John Hodgman, More Information Than You Require
41. Gary Snyder and Tom Killion, The High Sierra of California
42. Ernest Cline, Ready Player One
43. Jim Ottaviani and Leland Myrick, Feynman
44. Peter Bowler, The Superior Person's Book of Words
45. Pema Chödrön, The Places That Scare You
46. Katherine Paterson, The Great Gilly Hopkins

My favorite books from this year are probably 6, 12, 21, 22, and 41. But whittling down that much skips many books that I did really enjoy. And, I have to say that post-graduate school, reading about science did a lot to rekindle the joy I take in science, both more technical stuff like the science writing book, and more popular stuff like the Feynman graphic novel.

writing

Sep. 22nd, 2011 12:56 am
clevermynnie: (al fresco)
I went to the Dublin Writers Museum today, which has a great audio guide, a lot of early editions, and does a good job of putting a lot of famous Irish writers into the context of their times and Irish history. Plus the museum was in this gorgeous Georgian house with lovely ceilings that had gold and sky blue painted moldings, and the cafe had scones, cream, and tea that was inexpensive but generously proportioned.

I have been feeling some writer's block since coming here. It could be lingering thesis burnout, lingering emotional burnout, some pressure that it's supposed to be so amazing here and I have to somehow express that... but I am also not the best at just sitting down and writing. I get distracted too easily. Since I have the time right now, I'd like to be writing more, so I'm going to try to set up my morning routine along those lines.

I have been reading, though. I just finished the most recent Isabel Allende book, Island Beneath the Sea, and I've been going through this massive art history book I brought with me. I really want to read the whole thing, though that means I am still reading about the art of ancient cultures. But it's a nice textbook with a lot of good prints, and there's both a lot of interesting thematic things I never noticed before, and a lot of history that I could stand a refresher on.

interlude

Sep. 9th, 2011 11:18 am
clevermynnie: (and then?)
There was a delay in getting Ben's green card for Ireland, so for the past week we've been staying in Lancaster with his dad and stepmom. We originally thought we'd be leaving for Dublin the day after my defense, which would have been last Saturday, but instead we are leaving tomorrow and will be in Dublin this coming Sunday.

The week has been really nice. When we got here I felt so exhausted, not only from the several nights of really poor sleep leading up to my defense and right after, but also mentally from the stress of moving and preparing my talk. But we have gotten to sleep a lot here, I've been going with my stepmother-in-law to spin classes at the gym, they have a guitar and a piano that I can play, and they have a ton of books so I've been reading Franny and Zooey, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, and Einstein's Dreams, which are all excellent. It has rained a huge amount since we've gotten here, creeks swelling and flooding the roads, but we just sit in their house at the top of a hill and play Mariokart or watch DS9. We also cooked for the first time in ages, making gnocchi to use up some of the many potatoes they had.

In the end, this was the perfect thing to do after my thesis defense.

not so big

May. 29th, 2011 01:00 pm
clevermynnie: (Default)
I read a pretty cool book recently, The Not So Big House by Sarah Susanka. It's about identifying the features in your living space that are important to you, which rooms you use and what you use them for, and designing living space features around that. There were a lot of design ideas about how to make a room more multiuse with different lighting and organizational practices, and also discussions of how different room layouts contribute to room use, and a lot about how to really efficiently use the space you have. There were a lot of photos of spaces that exemplified the various ideas, and even though I am unlikely to build my own house from scratch anytime soon, I really enjoyed reading this book and I think there's a lot that's pretty useful to anyone trying to lay out their own living space well.

One thing that's going to be weird about our move is that apartments in Dublin tend to be furnished, so we'll be leaving a lot of our stuff here. We've got a lot of wall decorations that I don't know if we'll move or not... some of them, like our homemade wall scrolls, I suspect wouldn't make the trip very well. Though, much of our furniture is the cheapest IKEA stuff that we would have sold no matter where we were moving. And our basement has accrued a lot of scarcely used things which I suppose should be called junk, that we'll have to go through. Like our box of computer parts and our duplicate kitchen items.
clevermynnie: (and then?)

I kept a book log this year (last year's is here), which reveals just how much time I spent reading the Vorkosigan saga (all the Bujold books, which in addition I reread a few of).

Read more... )

 

My favorite books were probably, hmm.... 4, 6, 24, 26, and 43.

fan

Oct. 31st, 2010 10:13 pm
clevermynnie: (al fresco)
Two things: firstly, remember how I have been enjoying the work of Lois McMaster Bujold, specifically her Vorkosigan books? Well, apparently to stir up interest in the most recent one which was just released this month, all of the Vorkosigan books are now free online in every e-reader format as well as html, here at the Baen books website. This is awesome, especially because I have been able to get every book except Cryoburn, the new one, from the library, so I was able to read it online (not my preferred mode of reading a novel but I really wanted to read it!).

Secondly, I recently got to see the violinist Joshua Bell perform live... and I got his autograph!

joshua bell autograph


This may seem silly, but I really like Joshua Bell and have for awhile. He is also the only classical musician I have ever successfully identified aurally (though I don't try often), one late night while doing homework and listening to the classical radio station in Berkeley. At the concert where I saw him, he played the Mendelssohn violin concerto, a piece I love hearing. When he started the cadenza, I thought to myself, "he wrote this, it is so his style"... it turned out that I was right, although it also turned out that I had read a piece in the New Yorker that mentioned it a year earlier. I was too nervous to say much to him when I got his autograph, but it was amazing to see him perform.

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